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Old English Sheepdog (Bobtail)

Pictures of Old English Sheepdog (Bobtail)

Pronunciation

Old EnglishSheepdog

Description

The Old English Sheepdog is a strong, compact, square dog. The topline is lower at the shoulders slopping higher towards the back end. The chest is deep and broad. The head is large with a well defined stop. The nose is black. The teeth meet in a level or tight scissors bite. Eyes come in brown, blue or one of each color. The medium sized ears are carried flat to the head. The front legs are very straight and the hind legs are round and muscular. The small feet point straight ahead are round with well arched toes. The Old English Sheepdog is either born tailless (as the name Bobtail implies) or is completely amputated. Note: it is illegal to dock tails in most parts of Europe. The shaggy, double coat is long and profuse with a good hard textured outer coat and a soft waterproof undercoat. Coat colors include gray, grizzle, blue, blue gray, blue merle, gray with white markings or white with gray markings.

Temperament

The Old English Sheepdog is stable and happy-go-lucky. They are able to adjust oneself readily to different conditions, are loving and friendly. Loyal, protective and intelligent, they make a fine family companion. Friendly and gentle, they love and are good with children and are very much part of the family. They have a strong herding instinct and may try to herd people by bumping, not nipping, and need to be taught not to herd humans. Meek or passive owners or those that do not make the rules of the home clear in a way the dog can understand will cause the dog to become strong-willed. This breed needs firm, but calm, confident and consistent leadership. The Old English Sheepdog is a very good worker and is able to follow commands, but will ignore the instruction if they think they are stronger minded than their human pack members. The bark of the Old English Sheepdog sounds like a cracked bell. This breed remains puppy-like for many years, and age tends to hit them suddenly.

Height, Weight

Dogs 22-24 inches (56-61cm)    Bitches 20-22 inches (51 cm)
Dogs from 65 pounds (29 kg)    Bitches from 60 pounds (27kg) Some can grow to over 100 pounds (45 kg.)

Health Problems

Prone to IMHA (Immune Mediated Hemolytic Anemia), hip dysplasia and cataracts.

Living Conditions

The Old English Sheepdog will do okay in anapartment if it is sufficiently exercised. They are fairly active indoors andwill do best with at least an average-sized yard.

Exercise

These dogs were developed for hard work and love agood run. They need to be taken on adaily walk, jog or run. While out on the walk the dog must be made to heel beside or behind the person holding the lead, as in a dog's mind the leader leads the way, and that leader needs to be the human.

Life Expectancy

About 10-12 years

Grooming

The coarse, longhaired coat needs constant care tokeep it in top condition. Unless it is combed and brushed right through to thedense, water-proof undercoat at least three times per week, it will becomematted and the dog may develop skin problems, making them prone to host parasites. Clipout any tangles carefully so as not to nick the skin. A grooming table will makethe whole job easier. If the dog is not being shown, the coat can beprofessionally machine-clipped every two months or so, about one inch all theway around. In former times these dogs were shorn along with sheep. Trim aroundthe eyes and rear-end with blunt-nosed scissors. This breed sheds like a human, not a lot but in small amounts.

Origin

There are a few theories about the origin of the Old English Sheepdog. One is that it is related to the Poodle and the Deerhound. Other theories are it is related to the Briard and the Bergamasco, or from Scotch Bearded Collies and the Russian Owtchar, a hairy Russian breed brought to Great Britain on ships from the Baltic. The Old English Sheepdog was developed in the western countries of England by farmers who needed a quick, well-coordinated sheep herder and cattle driver to take their animals to market. The dogs became widely used in agricultural areas. Farmers began the practice of docking the tails in the 18th century as a way of identifying the dogs that were used for working so they could get a tax exemption. For this reason the dogs were given the nick name "Bobtail". Each spring when the sheep were sheared farmers would also shear the dogs coat to make warm clothing and blankets. The Old English Sheepdog has been used for reindeer herding because they tolerate cold weather so well. It was first shown in Britain in 1873 and by the AKC in 1888. Some of the Old English Sheepdog's talents include: retrieving, herding and watchdog.

Group

Herding, AKC Herding

Recognition

CKC, FCI, AKC, UKC, KCGB, CKC, ANKC, NKC, NZKC, APRI, ACR, DRA, NAPR

Pictures of Old English Sheepdog (Bobtail)

Pictures of Old English Sheepdog (Bobtail)
Pictures of Old English Sheepdog (Bobtail)
Pictures of Old English Sheepdog (Bobtail)
Pictures of Old English Sheepdog (Bobtail)
Pictures of Old English Sheepdog (Bobtail)
Pictures of Old English Sheepdog (Bobtail)
Pictures of Old English Sheepdog (Bobtail)
Pictures of Old English Sheepdog (Bobtail)
Pictures of Old English Sheepdog (Bobtail)
Pictures of Old English Sheepdog (Bobtail)
Pictures of Old English Sheepdog (Bobtail)
Pictures of Old English Sheepdog (Bobtail)
Pictures of Old English Sheepdog (Bobtail)
Pictures of Old English Sheepdog (Bobtail)
Pictures of Old English Sheepdog (Bobtail)