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Mudi

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Description

The Mudi has a wedge-shaped head with a pointed nose. Thejaws are muscular with a scissors bite. The skull is convex with a well-markedstop. The eyes are oval and dark brown. The ears are erect in the shape of anupside-down "V". It has a deep thorax. It is not unusual for thepuppies to be born without a tail. The back is straight and rather long. Thehind legs are surprisingly wide set. The hair on the muzzle is short, becomingbristly toward the ears. Its dense, wavy to curly coat is about 2 inches (5 cm.) longwith glossy hair that forms tufts and easy to care for. Coat colors include black,white, red, brown, gray, bread-pale, and fallow. There is also a very rare colorcalled "cifra" (blue-merle) which is dark or light gray and mixed witha black, spotted, striped, stained, marbly color. (The potential coat colors areactually limitless with this breed.)

Temperament

The Mudi is truly a rare dog. The few owners whoemploy and favor the Mudi find him incomparable. His seemingly unending list oftalents combined with his pleasant disposition makes him a top dog amongcanines. Highly intelligent, they can learn as quickly as Border Collies oreven faster. Extremely powerfuland courageous, the Mudi is afraid of nothing, not even wild boar, which it canoverpower quickly. It makes a good guard dog. It is very loving and gentle inthe family and has therefore gained appreciation as a companion dog that, if theneed arises, will defend both property and person. Within the family it also hasa tendency to bond with one particular person. Mudis can be wary of strangers.Socialize them well preferably at a young age. Some will not come up to a stranger until it sees that the person is friendlyand doesn't want to hurt it. They are not aggressive when they meet someone theydo not know; they just need to get accustomed to them. They will do okay withchildren if they are treated in such a way that they see humans above them in the pack order. Mudi are friendly withother dogs and will be okay with non-canine pets if they are raised with themfrom puppyhood or properly introduced as a new pet in the home. It is anobedient and playful companion, but can sometimes be noisy. They need to be taught not to bark unnecessarily. Mudi will do very well with a job to do. They need an owner who knows how to properly communicate the rules and one who has time for daily exercise.

Height, Weight

14-20 inches (38-47 cm.)
18-29 pounds (8-13 kg.)

Health Problems

This is a fairly healthy breed, although somecases of hip dysplasia have occurred, but not many.

Living Conditions

The Mudi can live in an apartment if it issufficiently exercised; however, they need space to run and play and would dobetter if not kept in one. They are moderately active indoors and will do bestwith at least a large yard. This breed can live outdoors.

Exercise

The Mudi is a very active breed. They need to be taken on a daily, long, brisk walk or jog, where they are made to heel beside or behind the human holding the leash, as in a dogs eyes, the pack leader leads the way. In addition, they will benefit from a large safe area where they can run free. They need a lotof running and other exercises to be in good condition. They love to play andwill excel in all kinds of sports such as flyball and Frisbee.

Life Expectancy

About 13-14 years.

Grooming

The Mudi is easy to groom. An occasional combingand brushing to remove dead hair is all it needs. This breed is an averageshedder.

Origin

The Mudi's fullname is Canis Ovilis Fenyesi (Dr Dezso Fenyesi separated Mudi from the Puli andPumi). The Hungarian herdsman's dogs were all classified together untilthe 1930's when the Mudi was separated from the Puli and Pumi.This all-purpose rural breed does not appear to be the result of plannedbreeding. The breed formed spontaneously and is only about one hundred yearsold. It is rare, even in Hungary - its country of origin. Its conformationstabilized in the early 1900's and its standards were written down according tothese original traits. Perhaps much of the reason for the rareness of this breedcan be attributed to the ever-present Puli and Komondor- older and more popular Hungarian working breeds. Perhaps the least known ofall Hungarian dogs, it is noted for the multiplicity of its uses both inside andoutside its native land. It has served as a flock guardian, sheep herder, cowherder, guard dog, hunter of wild animals, killer of mice and weasels and as acompanion. He is capable of handling his own flock without the assistance of athird paw. In Finland they are used as mountain-rescue dogs. Without theintervention of dedicated breeders, it would be in danger of extinction.

Group

Herding

Recognition

CKC, FCI, NKC, APRI, ACR, DRA, NAPR

Pictures of Mudi

Pictures of Mudi
Pictures of Mudi
Pictures of Mudi
Pictures of Mudi
Pictures of Mudi
Pictures of Mudi
Pictures of Mudi
Pictures of Mudi
Pictures of Mudi
Pictures of Mudi
Pictures of Mudi
Pictures of Mudi
Pictures of Mudi
Pictures of Mudi
Pictures of Mudi