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Labrador Husky

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Description

The Labrador Husky greatly resembles the wolf. It is slightly smaller than the Canadian Eskimo Dog and the Alaskan Malamute, but larger than the Samoyed and Siberian Huskies.

Temperament

The Labrador Husky is an unknown and often misunderstood breed. It is not a mix between a Labrador and a Husky, but a pure bred dog native of Coastal Labrador. It is similar in a lot of ways to the wolf. They do not bark, but can howl like a wolf. The objective in training this dog is to achieve a pack leader status. It is a natural instinct for a dog to have an order in their pack. When we humans live with dogs, we become their pack. The entire pack cooperatesunder a single leader. Lines are clearly defined and rules are set. Because a dog communicates his displeasure with growling and eventually biting, all other humans MUST be higher up in the order than the dog. The humans must be the ones making the decisions, not the dogs. That is the only way your relationship with your dog can be a complete success.

Height, Weight

 
60 -100 pounds (27-45 kg.)

Exercise

This breed needs to be taken on a dailylong walk or jog. While out on the walk the dog must be made to heel beside or behind the person holding the lead, as in a dog's mind the leader leads the way, and that leader needs to be the human.

Origin

The Labrador Husky is native to Coastal Labrador. It belongs to the northern group of dogs, which include theSiberian Husky, Samoyed,Alaskan Malamute and Canadian Eskimo Dog. The breed was most likely brought to Labrador by the Thule Inuit around 1300 AD and introduced to the Dorsets. The dogs were used as sled dogs to carry heavy loads. Inuits first lived in Alaska (900 - 1000 AD). Over the centuries, the Labrador's ancestor had become cut off, geographically, from the other northern breeds. To maintain the desired qualities of strength, vigor, stamina and intelligence inherent in their dogs, the descendants of the Thule Inuit had allowed the Labrador to breed with the native wolf populations. This practice continued until the invention of the snowmobile, when dogs were no longer needed to pull heavy loads.

Group

Northern

Recognition

DRA

Pictures of Labrador Husky

Pictures of Labrador Husky
Pictures of Labrador Husky
Pictures of Labrador Husky
Pictures of Labrador Husky
Pictures of Labrador Husky
Pictures of Labrador Husky
Pictures of Labrador Husky
Pictures of Labrador Husky
Pictures of Labrador Husky
Pictures of Labrador Husky
Pictures of Labrador Husky